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Introduction
Introduction

1. Beach holidays

2. Desert and oases

3. The empty mountains

4. Carthage and Romans

5. Islamic times

6. Berber sensations





















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INTRODUCTION
Beach holidays

Hammamet

Hammamet


Hammamet

Sousse


Hammamet

Sidi Bou Said


Tabarka

Tabarka


Zarzis

Zarzis



The first beach of Tunisia begins at the border to Algeria in the northwest, the last beach floats into Libya in the southeast. Rugged mountains and cliffs cut the beach line to create numerous of beautiful settings. Most beaches are deserted and hard to get by, but Tunisia today counts many fine holiday destinations. The most popular are part of old cities, but a few new have been designed purely to meet the needs of national and international visitors.
Hammamet/Nabeul, larger Sousse and the island of Jerba remains on top of the chart. Hammamet became a destination for European jetset in the early 20th century, coming here to enjoy all the possibilities of the relaxed sexual attitudes that dominate North Africa even today. Sousse has deep acient roots, but it is only a short walk from the historical UNESCO World Heritage quarters to a long long beach, which continues through Port el-Kantaoui, Tunisia's only purpose-made tourist town, and a quite successful one. Jerba is a world set apart, different in culture and architecture, but where almost half the coast line comes with parasols and beach beds.
Monastir, Sousse's southern neighbour begins another long beach continuing on to Mahdia, one of the most delightful coastal towns of Tunisia.
The coast outside Tunis also has many fine beach resorts, although few cater for foreigners. This makes them more attractive for many, the Tunisians you meet here are very open and friendly, and there are no biznes, young, poor Tunisian met looking for unattractive European women they can seduce for visa and entry to Europe. One of the destinations, may be the finest little town of the country: Sidi Bou Said. A little north of La Marsa cliffs take over, before you come to two of the best known "secrets" are found: Raf Raf and Sidi Ali el-Mekki.
Coming close to Algeria, there is only one real resort: Tabarka, which has European tourists, but also many Algerians. The coast east of Jerba on to Libya holds places that could well become the next big thing, hazy beaches that rise so low that they seem to wipe out the difference between sea and land. But still, the two established resorts, Sangho and Zarzis, are below the standard of what you find elsewhere in the country.




By Tore Kjeilen